Course Descriptions

African History

AFH 1000. African History and Civilization (3). This is an introductory course for African history and civilization. It covers the broad sweep of African history and culture. The primary emphasis will be to understand the background to some of Africa's major problems and possibilities today. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

AFH 3451. Sub-Sahara Africa Since 1800 (3). A history of Sub-Sahara Africa since 1800 is intended to provide an understanding of the background and problems of some of the African states today.

AFH 4302. North African History: A Survey (3). This course will concentrate on the modern history of North Africa including Maghrib, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia. It is intended to provide an understanding of the background and problems of North African states today.

 

American History

AMH 3310. Social History of the United States (3). An analysis of the day-to-day lives of American people. Topics treated will include morals, manners, religion, family, social class, health, and occupations.

AMH 3319. The Evolution of Law, Crime, and Justice in American Society, to 1876 (3). An intermediate level survey of the social and political developments in the fields of law and criminology, from the colonial era through Reconstruction. The course focuses upon social problems, criminal behavior, punishments, changing definitions of citizenship, and the Constitution.

AMH 3351. U.S. Political History to 1877 (3). Begins with the colonial and revolutionary background of U.S. politics. The bulk of the course studies U.S. political parties and elections from the 1790s to 1877. Special emphasis is placed on the presidency and on the groups and issues that have influenced political parties.

AMH 3352. U.S. Political History from 1877 to the Present (3). Studies U.S. political parties and elections from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the presidency and on the groups and issues that have influenced political parties. AMH 3351 is not a prerequisite for 3352.

AMH 3373. U.S. Business History (3). This historical survey of American business from colonial times to the present includes manufacturing, industrial development, agribusiness, organized labor, finance, management approaches, and the evolution of business ethics.

AMH 3444. History of the Trans-Mississippi American West (3). This course covers the history of the Trans-Mississippi West during the 19th century. Students are expected to develop an understanding of this area as a geographical region and its role in American history beginning with the early 19th century explorations and culminating with the symbolic "closing of the frontier" of the 1890s.

AMH 3470. The Evolution of Organized Crime (3). Course discusses the evolution of organized crime in the United States, the social and legal factors that contributed to its development, and the ethnic groups involved.

AMH 3472. Evolution of Law, Crime, and Justice in American Society: 1865 to the Present (3). This course serves as an intermediate level survey of the social and political developments in the fields of crime and law from the end of the Civil War to the present. Its focus is on the changing definitions of criminal behavior, regional patterns of crime, the changing nature of punishment and Constitutional issues relating to crime.

AMH 3540. Immigration History (3).

AMH 3540. Military History of the United States (3). A survey of both the military experiences and issues in American history. The course analyzes war, its economic issues, technological developments, politics, and other factors that have influenced the military aspects of American history.

AMH 3544. The United States and Vietnam, 1941-1975 (3). Course examines the involvement of the United States in Vietnam from World War II through the fall of Saigon in 1975 and considers the legacy of this experience for American foreign relations and society.

AMH 4110. Colonial America to 1763 (3). A study and comparison of the founding and development of the English colonies in North America.

AMH 4130. Revolutionary America, 1760-1788 (3). Course examines the political, social and economic history of British America from the end of the Seven Years War to the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Special emphasis will be given to the origins, course and aftermath of the colonial rebellion that became the American Revolution and led to the founding of the U.S. The course considers the fundamental causes of the Revolution and the many ways—some intended by the founders but many not—in which the former colonies were transformed by the experience.

AMH 4140. Thomas Jefferson's America (3). Examines the political and cultural history of the United States from the first presidential election through the "Era of Good Feelings." In 1789, the leaders of the new government faced a difficult and confusing task: they needed to build working political institutions out of the Constitution's vague instructions and at the same time create a stable, unified nation out of a divided and scattered collection of societies and peoples. The events of this period determined what type of nation the United States would become. Considerable attention will be devoted to Thomas Jefferson himself, as a figure who both shaped and represented his era.

AMH 4160. Andrew Jackson's America (3). Examines American politics, society and culture in the 1820s, '30s, and '40s. During these decades, the young republic experienced astonishing economic and geographic growth as its government became explicitly democratic for the first time. In the process, many older ways of life and inconvenient peoples were destroyed or shunted aside, as white farmers invaded Native American (and Mexican) lands and industrial capitalism enveloped the countryside. The course will focus on the turmoil that resulted from these changes, as well as on the era's remarkable achievements. Considerable attention will be devoted to Andrew Jackson himself, as a figure who both shaped and represented his era.

AMH 4172. The Civil War Era (3). In-depth study of the 20 years from 1845 to 1865. Emphasis will be placed on the coming of the Civil War, the secession crisis, and on both the military and nonmilitary events of the war years.

AMH 4173. Post-Civil War America, 1865-1890 (3). Analysis of post-Civil War America with emphasis on the Black role in American society and the attempt to heal the wounds of the Civil War. Other topics include the rise of big business, labor unions, and the last frontier.

AMH 4220. U.S. Progressive Era, 1890-1920 (3). This course will include a study of the development of domestic and foreign policy, the revolution of social thought, and the paradoxical path of reform in urbanized, industrial America. It will devote special attention to the nation's effort to accommodate old values with the new realities.

AMH 4231. The United States, 1920-1945: Prosperity, Depression, and World War II (3). A general course in United States history from 1920 through 1945, i.e., a study of political, economic, diplomatic, military, social, and cultural/intellectual developments during that period.

AMH 4270. The United States Since 1945 (3). This course focuses on the political and cultural issues faced by the United States during the period of the Cold War (1945 to 1988). Special attention is given to postwar affluence, suburban America, the mass society, the movement from isolationism to interventionism, McCarthyism, the civil rights movement, social conflict in the 1960s, and the rise of postwar conservatism.

AMH 4273. America in the 1960s (3). Examines selective aspects of the era known as "the sixties." Spanning two decades, it starts in 1954 with the decision to integrate America's schools as a flash point for the civil rights struggle, and it concludes in 1974 with Richard Nixon's resignation, the final statement in the Watergate affair. During those years of intense and accelerated change, civil rights, black power, the war in Vietnam, radical politics, and the counter culture divided the country so passionately that at times it appeared as though the nation might come apart.

AMH 4331. U.S. Intellectual History I: Beginning to 1880 (3). An interdisciplinary study of American thought from the Puritans to the late 19th century, asking, among other questions, what mission America assigned to itself. Among the ideas examined will be Puritanism, the Revolutionary ideology, federalism, the American Enlightenment, romanticism, individualism, and manifest destiny.

AMH 4332. U.S. Intellectual History II: 1880 to the Present (3). An interdisciplinary study of the impact on American thought of social Darwinism, industrialism, naturalism, the culture of consumption, radicalism, anticommunism, postindustrialism, and affluence. Examines the growth of cultural criticism as a task required of the 20th-century intellectual.

AMH 4402. The Old South (3). A study of the social and economic development of the Southern states from settlement by Europeans to the end of the Civil War with emphasis on the rise of the Cotton Kingdom and the causes of secession.

AMH 4403. The South Since 1865 (3). This course views the South both as a distinct region and as an area gradually coming back into "regular" American life after the Civil War. The unique problems of adjusting to defeat, the revolution in the labor system, and troubled race relations are considered.

AMH 4423. History of Florida from 1821 to the Present (3). A history of Florida from the period of its acquisition from Spain in 1821 until the present. The various "periods" in the state's past are discussed with major attention given to the period 1920 to the present—the period of greatest growth.

AMH 4441. History of the Frontier to 1865 (3). This course examines the Westward Movement from 1763 until 1865. Social, political, economic, and military aspects of the frontier experience, and the significance of the frontier in American history, are examined.

AMH 4463. Urban America Since 1879 (3). The development of American cities and the attempts to deal with changing urban problems from 1879 to the present.

AMH 4510. United States Foreign Relations to 1900 (3). This course examines the ideas, forces, and institutions which shaped American foreign policy in the era when America evolved from an agrarian republic to an industrial empire.

AMH 4511. Twentieth-Century United States Foreign Relations (3). The focus in this course is on the responsibilities of global power and how American foreign policy changed to meet rapidly altering circumstances.

AMH 4542. War and American Society (3). This course will explore the impact of war on American diplomatic, economic, political, social, and legal developments and institutions from the American Revolution to the present.

AMH 4553. American Legal History I (3). Surveys the history of the U. S. Constitution up to 1800, including the British background, the first state constitutions, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitutional Convention, ratification debates, and first use of the Constitution in the 1790s. It concludes with the first major controversies faced by the founders, issues that the Constitution did not resolve for them easily. The course is not about constitutional interpretation or theories applied by the current Supreme Court.

AMH 4554. American Legal History II (3). This course surveys the history of both the U.S. Constitution and American law in the 19th-century. Topics include the Marshall Court, slave law and the Dred Scott decision, the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the law, and the effects of industrialization on American law. The course is not about constitutional interpretation or theories applied by the current Supreme Court.

AMH 4561. Women in 19th-Century America (3). This course examines the experiences of women in 19th century America, focusing upon the ways gender, race, ethnicity, class, religion and region interacted to shape women's lives. Examines women's family, work, social, and political roles. Also examines women's contributions and quest for equality.

AMH 4562. Women in Modern America (3). This course examines the experiences and contributions of women in 20th-century America, with particular attention to the forces that served to differentiate the opportunities and roles of women from those of their male peers.

AMH 4565. Colonial and Revolutionary Era American Women's History (3). Course explores the lives of Native American, African and European women before they came into contact in America, how that contact altered their patterns of behavior, and how major events in America affected women's lives.

AMH 4571. Black America to 1877 (3). This course begins with the African background of Black Americans and ends with the final curtailment of Reconstruction in 1877. Although some portions of the course are topical, cutting across chronological divisions, there will be a general chronological progression from colonial times to the end of Reconstruction.

AMH 4572. Black America Since 1877 (3). This course traces the social, economic, cultural, and political activities of African-Americans from Reconstruction through the Civil Rights Movement.

AMH 4630. North American Environmental History (3).

AMH 4634. Florida Environmental History (3).

AMH 4640. Humor and the American Mind (3). This course discusses American intellectual and cultural history from the 18th-century to the present, through the lens of humor. It investigates the relationship between American ideas and historical transformations. It uses humor to explore the connections and tensions between the various parts of the American mind.

 

Asian History

ASH 3230. Middle East Survey (3).

ASH 4223. Modern Middle East (3). An examination of modern Middle Eastern history, focusing on the origins of recent problems in the imperialistic era, the clash of political and cultural traditions, national rivalries, the impact of OPEC, the Palestinians, and the Iranian Revolution.

ASH 4261. Central Asia Since the Mongols (3). This course covers Central Asian history through the medieval and modern periods, with special emphasis on the political and ethnic histories of the Central Asian peoples.

ASH 4402. China to 1898 (3). A study of China from Han through the Hundred Days' Reform of 1898.

ASH 4404. China Since 1898 (3). A study of China from the Boxer Uprising through the Kuomintang and Communist Revolutions.

ASH 4442. History of Modern Japan (3). An examination of the history of Japan from its emergence as a modern state in the mid-19th century, through its defeat in World War II, to its current position as a leading economic power. Focus is on political and social evolution, empire building, postwar reconstruction, and U.S.-Japan relations.

ASH 4520. Traditional India (3). This course deals with the history of India from antiquity to the 17th century. It puts special emphasis not only on the study of Indian religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism, but also on the roles played by various important ancient and medieval kings.

ASH 4550. Modern India (3). This course is an introduction to the history of India from the 18th century to the present. It deals in depth with the impact of British rule on India and the lives of modern South Asian leaders like Gandhi, Nehru, and Jinnah.

 

Classical History

Note: the following history courses are offered through the Department of Classical Languages, Literature, and Civilization.

ASH 3200. History of the Ancient Near East (3). A survey of the Near East—Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Holy Land—in the ancient period.

CLA 4437r. Studies in Greek History (3). Study of specified periods of Greek history, whether archaic, classical, or Hellenistic. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

CLA 4447r. Studies in Roman History (3). Study of specified periods of Roman history in the Republic or Empire. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

CLA 4880. Roman Law (3). A survey of the principles and procedures of Roman law.

EUH 3420. Rise and Fall of Classical Civilization (3). A survey of the histories of Greece and Rome and their major accomplishments.

EUH 4401. The Age of Alexander the Great (3). Study of the Greek world from the death of Socrates (399 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (146 B.C., the sack of Corinth by Mummius).

EUH 4402. Classical Athens and Sparta (3). History of Greece from the beginning to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on the social and political structures of Sparta and Athens.

EUH 4412. The Roman Republic (3). Study of the history of Rome from its foundation (traditionally 753 B.C.) to the fall of the Roman Republic (31 B.C., The Battle of Actium).

EUH 4413. The Roman Empire (3). The Roman Empire from the Augustus to Constantine. Emphasis on the evolution from the principate of the early empire to the monarchy of the late empire.

 

European History

EUH 3205. 19th-Century Europe: A Survey (3). European history from the close of the Napoleonic Wars to the turn of the century, a period in which Europe was at the height of its wealth and power. Particular attention will be paid to the major powers.

EUH 3206. 20th-Century Europe: A Survey (3). European history from the turn of the century through the two world wars. Particular attention will be paid to the major powers in this period when Europe declined from its preeminent position.

EUH 3293. Twentieth-Century Europe Through Film (3). This course discusses American intellectual and cultural history from the 18th-century to the present, through the lens of humor. It investigates the relationship between American ideas and historical transformations. It uses humor to explore the connections and tensions between the various parts of the American mind.

EUH 3431. Modern Italy (3). Traces the development of Italy from the Enlightenment to the present. Discussions will concentrate on the major social, political, and intellectual currents, centering on the unification movement, the crisis of the Liberal State, and Fascism.

EUH 3451. Modern France (3). French history from the ancient regime and its fall through the turbulent 19th century, the disastrous 20th century, and recovery after the Second World War.

EUH 3462. Modern Germany (3). Traces the history of Germany from 1815 to the present. Attention is primarily directed to the origins of the German national state; the political, economic, and cultural background of Nazi Germany; and the development of two rival states in the post-World War II era.

EUH 3501. The Making of Modern England (3). A rapid survey of English history from Anglo-Saxon times to 1783. The lectures will emphasize the constitutional and legal aspects of English history, while the readings will cover broadly cultural and social aspects as well.

EUH 3530. England, the Empire and the Commonwealth (3). A history of Great Britain and the Empire-Commonwealth since 1783 and developments within the Commonwealth itself. Some consideration is given to post-World War II changes within Britain and to Britain's foreign affairs.

EUH 3533. History of Ireland (3). Surveys the history of Ireland from prehistory and the Celtic-Gaelic settlement to the near-present. Examines the waves of settlers who came to the island since the Celts, and the problem of defining the Irish (i.e. the roles of religion and ethnicity). It cannot avoid treating in depth the tangled and tragic relations of the Irish with the kingdom of England, later Great Britain.

EUH 3551. Modern Poland (3). This course will examine the social, economic, and cultural as well as political development of the Polish nation in the 19th and 20th centuries. Although particular stress will be placed on internal history, appropriate attention will focus on Poland's role in international relations.

EUH 3571. Russia to Nicholas I (3). Russian history from the emergence of the Muscovite state through the establishment of the Romanov dynasty, to the reforms of Peter the Great and the enlightened despotism of Catherine the Great, and finally the nature of the state in the early 19th century.

EUH 3572. History of Russia, 1825 to the Present (3). This course will examine the social, economic, and cultural as well as the political development of Russia from the reign of Tsar Nicholas I to the present day. Although particular stress will be on internal history, appropriate attention will be paid to Russia's role in international relations.

EUH 4121. Earlier Middle Ages (3). This course provides a survey of European history from c. 300 to c. 1150, from the origins of the medieval world in the Roman, Christian, and Germanic past through the gradual emergence of a distinctively European civilization to its first major period of expansion and accomplishment.

EUH 4122. Later Middle Ages (3). This course provides a survey of European history from c. 1150 to c. 1500, from the height of medieval civilization in Europe through the crises of the late Middle Ages to the recovery leading to a new age.

EUH 4124. The Crusades (3). This course will provide a historical understanding of: the material and spiritual basis for the reentry of Western Christendom into the Mediterranean world; the ways in which Crusaders organized, financed, and participated in Crusades and the impact this had on European institutions and thought; the interrelations of Christians (East and West) and the Muslim world in the period of the Crusades.

EUH 4140. Renaissance (3). A study of the character of medieval Italy and a survey of economic, political, and cultural changes in Western Europe.

EUH 4144. Reformation (3). An examination of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in Europe from 1517 to the Peace of Westphalia in 1648.

EUH 4233. Rise of Nationalism (3). This course analyzes the European struggle toward democracy and nationalism from the collapse of Napoleonic Europe to the establishment of the German Empire, emphasizing the development of liberalism, socialism, communism, etc.

EUH 4241. The Holocaust in Historical Perspective (3). This course details the background and career of the Holocaust as well as the continuing problem of "Holocaust denial." Special emphasis is given to the ideas of such racists as de Gobineau and Hitler.

EUH 4242. World War I: Europe, 1900-1918 (3). This course will cover European history in the period 1900-1918 with a review of the domestic situation and foreign policy of the major Continental powers with an analysis of the origins of the war, how and why the war was fought as it was, and the experience of the major powers on the home front.

EUH 4243. Europe, 1870-1900: The Age of European Hegemony (3). This course will examine the period when the European states were at the apogee of their power and will concentrate on the domestic situation and foreign policy of the major continental powers, as well as special emphasis on Bismarkian diplomacy and the imperial rivalries in the Balkans and overseas.

EUH 4244. Fascism (3). This course deals with the organization, leaders, ideology, and governments of Fascist movements between 1919 and the end of World War II. The focus will be a comparative examination of Mussolini's Fascist dictatorship in Italy and Hitler's Nazi regime in Germany.

EUH 4282. Europe in the Cold War and Detente (3). Deals with the post-World War II era in Europe, tracing occupation policies, the division of Europe East and West, the development of the major European states, and the efforts to arrive at detente in respect to East-West tensions.

EUH 4331. East Central Europe, 1815 to Present (3). This course will examine the social, political, economic, and cultural development of the lands traditionally known as Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and the Baltic States from the Congress of Vienna to the present. Wherever possible, attempts will be made to present issues within a comparative framework.

EUH 4332. Balkans Since 1700 (3). The course of Balkan history emphasizing the penetration of the Hapsburg and Russian empires, the decay of the Ottomans, and the emergence of the Balkan states after the wars of liberation, with stress on the cultural peculiarities of the various ethnic groups.

EUH 4452. The Age of the French Revolution, 1715–1795 (3). This course is a study of the 18th century and its transformation by the forces unleashed by the French Revolution. The radicalization of the Revolution is traced to the Terror and the overthrow of Robespierre's dictatorship.

EUH 4454. Napoleonic Europe, 1795-1815 (3). This course traces the rise of Napoleon and his impact—political, social, economic, military, etc.—on France and Europe, culminating in his defeat at Waterloo.

EUH 4465. Nazi Germany (3). Deals with the background of the Nazi regime, the character of Hitler's dictatorship, and the origins and course of WWII in its European context. Also examined is National Socialism's impact on German institutions and racial consequences.

EUH 4500. England in the Middle Ages (3). History of England from Anglo-Saxon settlements to the establishment of the Tudor Dynasty. The course covers all significant aspects of life in medieval England, but emphasis is on growth of English common law and the constitution. Of particular interest to prelaw students.

EUH 4502. England Since 1870 (3). A history of Great Britain (since 1870) from a great world power to a European Common Market member. Economic, diplomatic, imperial, social, and political affairs are considered.

EUH 4510. Tudor England (3). History of England from the Yorkist kings in the late 15th century to the end of the reign of Elizabeth I in 1603. In addition, the course will cover the major points of Scottish and Irish history in the 16th century as well as English culture.

EUH 4512. Stuart England (3). History of England from the reign of James I to the death of Queen Anne in 1714. Scottish history will be covered as well, and due attention will be given to Irish history and to such areas as the arts, literature, and political theory.

EUH 4520. England, 1714-1870 (3). This course investigates the social cultural and political history of Great Britain from 1714 to approximately 1870. Major themes include the evolution of social structures; new cultural trends; changing political culture, ideologies and institutions as well as the relationship between these perspectives.

EUH 4544. Sex and Class in England, 1750-1914 (3). Offers students a perspective on the critical relations between class and gender in industrializing England, 1750-1914. Examines the lives and activities of English women, from the poorest to the wealthiest classes, against the background of the major dislocations occurring in British society during this period.

EUH 4574. 19th-Century Russia (3). An examination of the history of Russia from 1801 to the beginning of the 20th century, with emphasis on foreign relations and the development of the political and social conflicts that resulted in the revolutions of 1917.

EUH 4576. 20th-Century Russia (3). This course will examine the social, economic, cultural, and international, as well as political, development of Russia from the final years of Tsarist rule through the Bolshevik Revolution to its emergence as one of the world's superpowers in the 1990s.

EUH 4602. European Intellectual History, 1500-1800 (3). History of ideas documenting transition from "Medieval Mind" to "Modern Mind," including impact of four Renaissances, Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Age of Enlightenment. Interdisciplinary approach includes philosophy, literature, art, political theory, science, economic thought, religion, and music.

EUH 4603. European Intellectual History, 1800 to Present (3). History of ideas in the last two hundred years, exploring the 19th century as the Age of "Isms" (including Liberalism, Conservatism, Communism, Romanticism, Idealism, Nationalism, Industrialism, Imperialism, Positivism, Darwinism, Historicism) and establishing the 20th century as the Age of Crisis in which traditional Western Civilization disintegrates.

HIS 4250. War and the Nation State (3). This course examines the phenomenon of war in its broader social-political-economic context from a historical and comparative perspective.

 

Latin American History

LAH 3411. History of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean (3). Covers the history of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean nations of Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Puerto Rico from the Indian civilizations of the remote past to the social conflicts of the present.

LAH 3456. History of Panama Since 1940 (3). Covers the history of Panama from 1940 to the present. Emphasizes the impact of WWII, politics, social change and democracy in Panama.

LAH 3500. History of South America (3). An introductory survey from the Inca Civilization to modern Chile, Peru, Argentina, etc. Emphasis is placed on the contrasts and conflicts between Indian and European culture and on basic social, economic, and political evolution. The persistence of "underdevelopment" and poverty are also explored.

LAH 3734. Latin American History Through Film (3). Introduction to Latin American history through films. Analysis of how Latin Americans are portrayed in international and national cinema. Integration of television and literature to illustrate the impact of mass media on Latin Americans.

LAH 4430. History of Mexico (3). Covers the history of Mexico from the great Indian empires to the present, emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries. Deals with cultural and social history as well as political movements.

LAH 4470. History of the Caribbean (3). Cuba, Puerto Rico, and other Caribbean societies are the subjects of this course. European and United States colonialism and local Caribbean forces are studied to help understand the area's social, economic, and political problems and prospects.

LAH 4600. History of Brazil (3). Latin America's largest and most populous nation is the subject of this course. Themes include the evolution of Brazil's multiethnic society, the struggle for economic development, and the search for a viable political regime.

LAH 4723. Race and Class in Colonial Latin America (3). Comprehensive examination of Latin America from 1492 to 1830, with emphasis on native and African reactions to colonial rule and the creation and growth of multi-ethnic groups and their solidification into classes.

LAH 4748. Social Revolutionary Movements in Latin America (3). Thematic coverage of the history of social revolutionary movements in Latin America, using specific case studies drawn from, among others, the Mexican, Bolivian, and Cuban revolutions.

 

Liberal Studies

Area III Courses

Note: in order to fulfill the liberal studies requirement in history, a student must complete a minimum of three (3) semester hours from this list: AMH 1091, AMH 2010, AMH 2020, AMH 2095, AMH 2096, AMH 2097; ASH 1044, ASH 3100; EUH 2000; LAH 1093; WOH 1023, WOH 1030. Each of the courses in the history liberal studies area shall include a substantial writing component, defined as 3,000 words per course.

AMH 1091. The African American Experience in the United States (3). This course will examine, both chronologically and thematically, the experience of African-Americans in the United States and their role in shaping the nation's history. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

AMH 2010. A History of the United States (3). A survey of United States history with emphasis on social, economic, and political issues up through the Civil War. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.

AMH 2020. A History of the United States (3). A survey of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.

AMH 2095. The American Indians and the United States (3). Course surveys American Indian relations with the people and the government of the United States, beginning in the 1760s and continuing to the present. Examines the Indians' diplomatic and military struggles, first to retain their territories and later to maintain some level of self-determination and cultural integrity. Students will also be exposed to the Indian perspective on familiar historical events such as the Civil War, the New Deal, and the 1960s. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

AMH 2096. Black Women in America (3). This course will examine (using both a chronological and a thematic approach) the unique experience of the African-American woman in the United States and the role that black women have played in shaping this nation's history. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

AMH 2097. Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3). The history of immigration to the United States. Includes the evolution of ethnic cultures and the role of race, acculturation and assimilation, and the conflict from colonial times to the present. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

ASH 1044. Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3). This is an introductory course on Middle Eastern history and culture with a considerable emphasis on the impact of religion: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The primary emphasis of the course will be to understand the historical and cultural background of the major problems facing the Middle East today. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

ASH 3100. History of Asia (3). This course is an introduction to political, cultural, and economic Asian history from antiquity to the present. It places special emphasis not only on the study of important Asian kings and leaders but also on the various religions which originated in Asia.

EUH 2000. Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (3). This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on patterns of thinking and on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for EUH 2000. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

LAH 1093. Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3). A cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

WOH 1023. The Modern World to 1815 (3). This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

WOH 1030. The Modern World Since 1815 (3). This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents in the modern world since 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1030. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

 

Other History Courses

HIS 3464. History of Science (3).

HIS 4070. Oral History (3). Exposes students to the use of oral history as a research technique and provides experience in conducting professionally acceptable oral history interviews. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

HIS 4080. Archives Management (3). The nature of archives; various types of records; arranging and processing archives; restoring and protecting records; archival institutions, policies, and procedures. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

HIS 4081. Museum Management (3). History and philosophy of museums, especially historical museums; organization and operation; planning exhibits; educational activities; and public relations. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

HIS 4086. Historic Sites Identification and Preservation (3). The identification, preservation, and maintenance of historic sites; the historic preservation movement. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.

WOH 4235. Disease, Race, and Environment (3).

HIS 4906r. Directed Individual Study (1-4). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours. Course will not count as credit toward the history major or minor.

HIS 4930r. Special Topics in History (3). Specialized approaches to history. Topics will vary. The course may be repeated for different topics to a maximum of nine (24) semester hours.

HIS 4931r. Tutorial in History (1-2). Prerequisites: Senior history majors and minors only; instructor's permission. Selected topics in history. A maximum enrollment of five (5) students in each tutorial. May be repeated only once and to a maximum of four (4) semester hours. Course will not count as credit toward the history major or minor.

HIS 4935r. Senior Seminar (3). Advanced training in historical methods and historiography. The historical material (African, American, Asian, British, European, Latin American, or Middle Eastern) varies from seminar to seminar depending upon the instructor's area of expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

HIS 4936r. Honors Work (1-6). Open to participants in the University's and departmental honors program. The student must complete six (6) thesis hours. This course will not count as credit toward the history major. May be repeated to a maximum of nine (9) semester hours.

WOH 4244. World War II (3). Avoiding the common Eurocentric approach, this course deals with World War II on a global basis. It analyzes the character of the Pacific theater as well as that of the European war, presenting the student with insights into and contrasts between the various belligerents.

Legacy Sort
1
Legacy Priority
6